AS YOU LIKE IT

For those of us who prefer our Bard Of Avon short and sweet, Denise Devin is back with another of her hour-long Shakespeare Short Cuts, the result of which is an As You Like It exactly as you (and I) like it.
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HEDDA GABLER

RECOMMENDED

Some of L.A.’s finest stage stars take center stage in Andrew Upton’s 2002 version of Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, and while the age-blind casting of most of the play’s lead roles proves problematic, the Antaeus Company’s latest partner-cast revival nonetheless offers Los Angeles theatergoers some of the finest acting in town.
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TEMPEST REDUX

You don’t have to be a Shakespeare lover to fall under the spell of John Farmanesh-Bocca’s magically reimagined ninety-minute take on The Tempest, the Bard’s classic tale of treachery, revenge, and transformative forgiveness, fittingly retitled Tempest Redux and mesmerizing audiences at West L.A.’s Odyssey Theatre.
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SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR

A Noise Within revives Luigi Pirandello’s 1921 absurdist classic Six Characters In Search Of An Author with enough exciting theatricality to largely overcome the dated melodrama of the play-within-a-play that its sextet of author-seeking Characters are hoping to see performed.
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YOU NEVER CAN TELL

The words “frothy romp” may not be the first to pop into a theatergoer’s head when describing a George Bernard Shaw comedy, but this is precisely what the author of Man And Superman, Mrs. Warren’s Profession, and Saint Joan confectioned back in 1897 when he wrote You Never Can Tell (his “Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better” response to Oscar Wilde’s The Importance Of Being Earnest), evidence of which can currently be savored at A Noise Within’s ever so frothy, ever so rompy revival of this lesser-known Shaw gem.
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ROMEO AND JULIET

Graffiti-covered inner-city walls, dumpsters, and assorted skid-row detritus provide a startling but effective backdrop for A Noise Within’s Romeo And Juliet, director Dámaso Rodríguez’s electrifying new look at the age-old classic.
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UNCLE VANYA

You know from the moment Ilya Ilych Telegin, aka “Waffles,” starts the show off by singing and strumming along to Marvin Etzioni’s “The Mandolin Man” that The Antaeus Company’s West Coast Premiere of Annie Baker’s Drama Desk Award-winning adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya isn’t going to be like any Vanya (or perhaps any Chekhov) you’ve seen, and though I remain ambivalent about the talky Russian playwright, when the Anateus revival takes flight, it soars.
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