CARMEN DISRUPTION

Prolific British playwright Simon Stephens goes avant-garde in Carmen Disruption, meaning that no matter how much you may have loved the edgy realism of Punk Rock or the captivating whimsy of Heisenberg or the utter magic of his stage adaptation of Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time, you may well find his artsy 2015 take on Bizet a good deal less engaging.
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OTHER DESERT CITIES

Real-life sisters Ellen Geer and Melora Marshall and Geer’s daughter Willow play characters with matching family ties in Theatricum Botanicum’s superb outdoor revival of Jon Robin Baitz’s Other Desert Cities.
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AMERICAN HOME

Homeownership dreams come true, then fall apart in Stephanie Alison Walker’s overly ambitious American Home, whose intriguing premise and promising opening scenes soon develop into an excessively populated, tonally uneven, insufficiently involving World Premiere dramedy.
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CIGARETTES AND CHOCOLATE & HANG UP

And now for something completely different, Pacific Resident Theatre treats L.A. audiences to the West Coast Premieres of Cigarettes & Chocolate and Hang Up, a couple of Anthony Mighella-penned BBC radio plays from the ‘80s that add up to considerably more than a staged reading, slightly less than the “fully designed/staged production” that’s been advertised, yet one that’s every bit as gorgeously acted as PRT’s compelling best.
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THE LOST CHILD

An long-estranged couple, a mysterious waif looking at least half-a-decade younger than her eighteen years, and a Grimm’s Fairy Tale-style cabin in the woods add up to an unsatisfying mix of Unsolved Mysteries and The Twilight Zone in Skylight Theatre Company’s World Premiere production of Jennifer W. Rowland’s The Lost Child.
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SEQUENCE

Lightning from up north strikes Beverly Hills for the second time this year as Theatre 40 follows January’s challenging-but-rewarding Late Company with another thrilling Canadian import, the West Coast Premiere of Arun Lakra’s brain-teasing, mind-blowing Sequence.
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DIAL “M” FOR MURDER

The Group Rep starts the summer off with a stylishly directed, classily designed, mostly quite well-cast revival of Frederick Knott’s classic 1952 thriller Dial “M” For Murder.
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THE PRIDE

The Pride, Alexi Kaye Campbell’s provocative, daringly constructed look at the changes wrought over five decades of Contemporary Gay History, has at long last arrived in L.A., masterfully directed at the Wallis Annenberg Center For The Performing Arts by its brilliant Artist-In-Residence Michael Arden.
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