CAT’S PAW

Suspense dramas don’t much more edge-of-your-seat nor subject matter more hot-button than William Mastrosimone’s 1986 eco-terrorism thriller Cat’s Paw, updated by the author in 2011, more relevant than ever in 2017, and the terrific latest from Actors Co-op.
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STILL LIFE

Questions of love and mortality propel Still Life, Alexander Dinelaris’s mostly compelling look at a couple of damaged souls with a shared belief in death’s imminent arrival, a Rogue Machine West Coast Premiere that proves most effective when centering on its two leads, stunningly portrayed by Laurie Okin and Lea Coco.
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33 VARIATIONS

Actors Co-op’s intimate revival of Moisés Kaufman’s 33 Variations is not only one of the year’s finest 99-seat productions, it is among the all-time best I’ve seen at the Co-op since first discovering the Hollywood theatrical gem over two decades ago.
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DIE, MOMMIE, DIE!


Silver screen goddess Angela Arden lives again in Celebration Theatre’s hilariously over-the-top revival of Die, Mommie, Die!, Charles Busch’s affectionately acidic tribute to the bevy of fading female icons who made their last defiant stand in 1960s La La Land.
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DOG SEES GOD: CONFESSIONS OF A TEENAGE BLOCKHEAD

Teens play teens, and winningly so, in Worst First Kiss Productions’ terrific intimate staging of Bert V. Royal’s hilarious, thought-provoking, ultimately transformative Dog Sees God: Confessions Of A Teenage Blockhead, a sold-out guest production this weekend only at Hollywood’s The Blank Theatre.
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PLASTICITY

40something David Rosely lies comatose as his identical twin Grant and fiancée Kate find themselves in head-to-head combat over his right to live or die. If this sounds more like a Lifetime Original Movie than the year’s most spectacular one-man tour-de-force, think again. Solo-performance star Alex Lyras and his co-writing partner Robert McCaskill are back in Hollywood with their latest collaboration, the absolutely thrilling Plasticity, the very definition of must-see theater.
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MOM’S DEAD

Dysfunctional families have guaranteed theatrical fireworks since the Ancient Greeks, and families don’t get much more dysfunctional than the Thompsons in Nathan Wellman’s darkly comedic Mom’s Dead, a frequently compelling if overly padded World Premiere from Sacred Fools.
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UNBOUND

Sympathy-defying characters in credibility-challenging situations make D.G. Watson’s Unbound a less than riveting follow-up to IAMA Theatre Company hits like A Dog’s House, The Recommendation, and The Accidental Blonde.
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