RUNAWAY HOME

A fourteen-year-old far too smart, self-assured, and resourceful for her own good takes to the streets of New Orleans three years after Hurricane Katrina lay waste to the city’s Lower Ninth Ward in Jeremy J. Kamps’ Runaway Home, a Fountain Theatre World Premiere that proves every bit as compelling a slice-of-post-Katrina-life as it is a bona fide crowd-pleaser.
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STUPID KID

Folks are dumb where Chick Ford comes from, which is why you may be excused for assuming at first that Sharr White’s Stupid Kid has nothing but poor white trash jokes in store for audiences at The Road On Magnolia. But think again. Chick and his kinfolk are about to reveal far more about the Eastern Colorado Fords than initially meets the eye.
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FIXED

A sexually confused Filipino-American “ladyboy,” the drag princess’s sexually confused Mexican-American sort-of boyfriend, and the sort-of boyfriend’s just plain confused sort-of girlfriend, all three of them in massive states of denial, play out a centuries-old game of love and death in contemporary L.A. in Boni B. Alvarez’s Fixed, a Filipino-Latino telenovela come deliciously to life on the Atwater Village Echo Theater stage.
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THE LOST CHILD

An long-estranged couple, a mysterious waif looking at least half-a-decade younger than her eighteen years, and a Grimm’s Fairy Tale-style cabin in the woods add up to an unsatisfying mix of Unsolved Mysteries and The Twilight Zone in Skylight Theatre Company’s World Premiere production of Jennifer W. Rowland’s The Lost Child.
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THE DEVIL’S WIFE

Three recently bereaved sisters find their world rocked by a mystery man dressed all in black (save a pair of blood-red satin gloves) in Tom Jacobson’s devilishly droll period thriller The Devil’s Wife, a Skylight Theatre Company World Premiere.
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DEAD BOYS

An über-macho 20something and his not-nearly-so-manly former schoolmate find themselves possibly the only two people left alive on earth in Dead Boys, Matthew Scott Montgomery’s funny, touching, romantic, edge-of-your-seat hour-long look at racism, homophobia, and the apocalypse now.
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KING OF THE YEES

Chinese-American playwright Lauren Yee pays affectionate, rib-tickling, ultimately quite touching tribute to her dad Larry in King Of The Yees, a Center Theatre Group World Premiere now both delighting and illuminating audiences of all racial-ethnic-cultural persuasions at Culver City’s Kirk Douglas Theatre.
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THE CAKE

Bekah Brunstetter puts a deeply personal, delightfully down-home face on the Gay-Wedding-Cake Wars in The Cake, the gifted young playwright’s latest World Premiere dramedy, another feather in director Jennifer Chambers’ and The Echo Theater Company’s multi-plumed hats.
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